Public engagement in science

Top PDF Public engagement in science:

Participatory science : encouraging public engagement in ONEM

Participatory science : encouraging public engagement in ONEM

Title : Participatory science : encouraging public engagement in ONEM Abstract This article provides a case study of a participatory science project that involved collecting observations of a giant grasshopper and registering them online. Our objective is to reflect on conditions for meaningful amateur engagement on Web 2.0 science platforms. Our overall approach is qualitative and ethnographically informed and draws on multiple data sources collected over a period of 18 months: semi-structured interviews, observations, statistical analysis of online activity, and document analysis. We identify a number of factors that enable widespread participation in this naturalist inquiry, organized by Observatoire Naturaliste des Écosystèmes Méditerranéens (ONEM). Our findings illustrate how the association’s double goals of stimulating an appreciation for nature and increasing scientific knowledge of the species under investigation are articulated as both naturalists and the general public participate. This double objective and the inquiry’s locus of control - neither scientist-driven nor grassroots-based - leads us to call for a refinement of existing typologies of participatory science projects. This case illustrates how even low-level participation (crowdsourcing type) can produce significant results – not only in terms of generating scientific knowledge, but also in increasing public engagement with science
En savoir plus

37 En savoir plus

Emerging Patterns of Depoliticization and Engagement to  Inform the Future of Science and Technology Studies: A Case Study in  Nanotechnologies

Emerging Patterns of Depoliticization and Engagement to Inform the Future of Science and Technology Studies: A Case Study in Nanotechnologies

R OCO  &   B AINBRIDGE ,  2003).  The  STS  community  would  therefore  make  a  strong  commitment  to  interfere  in  the  R&D  process  of  nanotechnologies,  and  to  enhance their inclusiveness of social concerns. Nanotechnologies were a unique  opportunity  to  take  on.  Second,  it  happened  for  the  first  time  in  a  context  whereas the SCOT approach was more or less dominating the field. There were  theoretical  possibilities  to  enhance  the  development  of  nanotechnologies  by  making  them  more  “social”,  which  was  obviously  requiring  (if  this  program  of  action was to be pursued) sort of a normative position from the STS community  (on  how  to  make  them  socially  resilient).  The  pragmatic  limitations  of  deliberative action and public participation exercises were then outlined by the  abundant literature published, for instance, within the framework of the Human  Genome Project (HGP), and its few actual outcomes by comparison with the huge  scale  of  the  research  projects  (F ISHER ,  2005).  Thus,  there  was  a  need  to  foster  new  models  of  governance  for  nanotechnologies,  built  upon  previous  experiences and with a strong external push forward effectiveness, as I should  mention  below.  In  our  view,  those  commitments  led  to  a  increasingly  engaged  perspective of many scholars, determined to induce actual social changes in the  curse of developing nanotechnologies.  
En savoir plus

20 En savoir plus

Revisiting "upstream public engagement" in nanotechnologies : from the perspective of the public sphere

Revisiting "upstream public engagement" in nanotechnologies : from the perspective of the public sphere

HCWH Europe, ETUI, etc., also expressed their frustration in this regard. The UK is one of the earliest countries which dedicated to experimenting novel initiatives of dialogue and public engagement in nanotechnologies. As introduced in Chapter II, most CSOs involved in the awareness-raising phase come from the UK, and there was rich and active civil society movement during the early phase. However, an advisory body of the UK indicated that the leading position that the UK enjoyed at the time of the publication of the RS/RAEng report was no longer as highly regarded due to “a distinct lack of Government activity or funding” in research into EHS aspects of nanomaterials (The Council for Science and Technology 2007, 5). Furthermore, the reluctance of the UK government in introducing mandatory regulations is another cause for CSOs’ discontent. In 2006, the UK Government Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) initiated a voluntary reporting scheme for manufactured nanomaterials. Eight CSOs released a joint letter, highlighting that such a scheme would further delay regulatory action and make products containing nanomaterials “untested, unregulated and unlabelled” 192 .
En savoir plus

252 En savoir plus

Engaging the public in nanotechnology? Three visions of public engagement

Engaging the public in nanotechnology? Three visions of public engagement

being a “parody of democracy” 12 . The Forum concluded by saying that the “general public” 13 should be involved in technology policy, but did not consider how. The meanings granted to the “engagement of the public” differed greatly according to the speakers, ranging from conveying information to active participation in the decision-making process about the nature of research projects. Following the Forum, La Metro ordered a report to a group of Science and Technology Studies (STS) scholars led by Pierre-Benoit Joly. They were asked to do a comparative review of public participatory mechanisms in technology and make recommendations. The report (Joly, 2005) was released in September 2005 and recommended to organize a citizen conference to decide about the future of nanotechnology projects in Grenoble. Within the context of the decisions already made, it identified the possibility of public intervention, in terms of research orientation and funding, which could have been led, for example, in the case of the second phase of the
En savoir plus

32 En savoir plus

Shifting and Deepening Engagements: Experimental Normativity in Public Participation in Science and Technology

Shifting and Deepening Engagements: Experimental Normativity in Public Participation in Science and Technology

These questions are further complicat- ed by the fact that social scientists themselves increasingly instigate and coordinate participatory activities in S&T, for instance through consensus conferences and scenario workshops. This is distinctively the case with new and emerging technologies, where social researchers mobilize citizens and natural scientists in experiments with “anticipatory governance” (Barben et al. 2008) and provide partic- ipatory expertise in potentially contro- versial contexts (Joly and Kaufman 2008). Often, these initiatives assume a scope, reach, and aims that differ from policy rationales. They can also differ considerably from one another. The multiplicity of engagement for- mats and the variety of expectations and demands they entail, produces contradictions and uncertainties that are normative and political in charac- ter, as actors seek both to justify and prescribe particular lines of action for others to follow, and organize them- selves for mutual support. As these processes invariably implicate the so- cial scientist in various ways, there is a need to empirically examine and con- ceptually frame the forms of engage- ment he enacts (Macnaghten et al. 2005, Bennett and Sarewitz 2006). Thence, we ask ourselves how we re- late to policy makers, citizens, natural scientists, and other social scientists in public participation. How should we engage with these actors and how should we study them? Under which conditions and on which grounds do we act? More broadly, how do we un- derstand the political and normative significance of our work?
En savoir plus

20 En savoir plus

Microplastic freshwater contamination: an issue advanced by science with public engagement

Microplastic freshwater contamination: an issue advanced by science with public engagement

Dris R, Imhof H, Sanchez W, et al (2015) Beyond the ocean: contamination of freshwater ecosystems with (micro-)plastic particles. Environ Chem 12:539. doi: 10.1071/EN14172 Eerkes-Medrano D, Thompson RC, Aldridge DC (2015) Microplastics in freshwater systems: A review of the emerging threats, identification of knowledge gaps and prioritisation of research needs. Water Res 75:63–82. doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2015.02.012

5 En savoir plus

ARTheque - STEF - ENS Cachan | Science, public et communication (quelques remarques)

ARTheque - STEF - ENS Cachan | Science, public et communication (quelques remarques)

On ne peut parler de "Commun~cation avec le public" que s~ plus de la mOltlé des gens comprennent plus de la moitié de ce qui est exposé, et ceci quelles que soient les circonsta[r]

2 En savoir plus

Social Science Research and Public Policies: the Case of Immigration in Belgium

Social Science Research and Public Policies: the Case of Immigration in Belgium

dependence, crime and violence, academic failure, etc. Although such correlations were not found empirically by researchers, social scientists devised methods to measure what was not there: the focus of research was on the lack of self-esteem and its (non)-relation to social problems. 6 From the “discovery” of its absence, social scientists have created a tangible vision of a “state of esteem”. Kruikshank observes that this shows how “the social sciences can be seen as productive sciences: the knowledge, measurements and data they produce are constitutive of relations of governance as well as the subjectivity of the citizens”. She argues that it is the productive capacities of social science, in this case through social scientists who were members of the California Task Force to Promote Self-Esteem and Personal and Social Responsibility, that produced “the subject, as one who lacks self-esteem, and it is social science research that sets the terms for telling the truth of that subject (… )” and eventually “it falls to social science to establish policy measures to regulate the subject according to that truth” (Kruikshank 1996: 237). As Dean observed, Kruikshank’s study reveals how some forms of expertise and knowledge can constitute categories of people such as the “poor”, the “unemployed”, the “migrant criminal”, etc. who then become the object of intervention (Dean 1999: 71). It also legitimises the constitution of various agencies and professionals to enact government programmes. These cases alert us to the transformation of modes of government and to the role of various forms of expertise and knowledge within such modes. How should scientific researchers situate themselves in an increasingly competitive research market, facing a growing number of non-academic researchers who may not necessarily follow the same deontological and methodological rules as those which academic researchers ought to adhere to? In this respect, the attitude of Belgian criminologists and sociologists is an example of good practice. A few years ago, the former Belgian Minister of Justice Marc Verwhilgen commissioned a study on the relation between people with an immigrant background and criminality. All Belgian criminologists refused to carry out the research on the ground that the very question was dubious. 7 Eventually, the minister had to turn to a Dutch researcher. In reply to the commissioning of such a research project, several prominent Belgian criminologists and sociologists edited a volume entitled Mon délit, mon
En savoir plus

83 En savoir plus

La technologie contestée : participation du public et prise de décision en matière de science et de technologie

La technologie contestée : participation du public et prise de décision en matière de science et de technologie

Sondages d’opinion publique, interviews en profondeur et autres techniques similaires de recueil de l’information sont bien au point et pratiqués de façon permanente dans tous les pays. L’une des techniques mises au point et expéri­ mentées depuis 1972 par le Service des forêts des Etats-Unis est un système baptisé « Codinvolve »149. Il s’agit d’un système appliqué à l’analyse de contenu et conçu pour transcrire de grandes quantités d’informations écrites de sources diverses sous une forme facilement résumable pour l’utilisation des décideurs. Après avoir identifié les questions qui sont importantes pour ceux-ci, les cher­ cheurs codent toutes les déclarations correspondantes émises sur un sujet donné dans les lettres personnelles, les rapports, les pétitions et résolutions, éditoriaux de journaux, etc. Ces diverses déclarations sont condensées en faisceaux d’opinions et des tableaux sont ensuite dressés à l’intention des décideurs, résumant la nature des opinions du public en fonction du degré de soutien ou d’opposition qu’elles expriment sur un sujet ou un projet donné. Une analyse et une interprétation secon­ daires sont possibles, soit manuellement, soit à l’aide des techniques informatiques. Le système Codinvolve est fondamentalement conçu comme un outil d’ana­ lyse qui permet aux décideurs d’évaluer une plus large gamme d’attitudes que celles qui ressortiraient d’auditions publiques, ou que celles qu’on pourrait recueillir en réponse à des annonces. Depuis 1972, ce système a été utilisé dans plus de trente études du Service des forêts pour analyser plus de 50 000 données recueillies dans le public. Le coût d’une analyse Codinvolve ressort généralement entre 1 et 3 dollars par donnée traitée, selon la complexité des données et autres facteurs. Cette technique a été le plus souvent employée pour la préparation des études d’impact sur l’environnement qui sont exigées, en vertu du National Envi- ronmental Policy Act de 1969, pour chacune des décisions des autorités fédé­ rales affectant de façon significative l’environnement humain.
En savoir plus

136 En savoir plus

ARTheque - STEF - ENS Cachan | Science, manchette de journal, grand public

ARTheque - STEF - ENS Cachan | Science, manchette de journal, grand public

L'exercice de la manchette étant un art somme toute difficile (choisir quelques mots qui expriment le contenu d'un exposé scientifique) les résultats ont été divers mais enrichissants à [r]

5 En savoir plus

ARTheque - STEF - ENS Cachan | La science en images : pourquoi, comment et pour quel public ?

ARTheque - STEF - ENS Cachan | La science en images : pourquoi, comment et pour quel public ?

D'autre part, la compréhension rapide des notions abstraites ou de processus compliqués et leur mémorisation peut être facilitée parles images de synthèse utilisées pour les illustrer.. [r]

6 En savoir plus

Social Science Research and Public Policies: the Case of Immigration in Belgium

Social Science Research and Public Policies: the Case of Immigration in Belgium

4. Major Findings 4.1 Weight of History and Ideology The influence of history and ideology – the dominant conceptions of the nation – on the processes of agenda-setting, policy-making and the implementation of policies in the field of immigration and on the impact of research on these processes have been highlighted throughout this study. In fact, our research shows how pervasive the differentialist rhetoric in Flemish-speaking Belgium and the universalist paradigm in French-speaking Belgium are (Martiniello and Manco 1993). The influence of this rhetoric on public policies relating to immigrants is most obvious in the case of teaching pupils of foreign origin. In the early 1990s, the Flemish Government tried to develop a coherent integration policy, the so- called “immigrant policy”. Soon after it also developed a genuine education policy for children of immigrant origin (Verlot 2001a, 2001b). Interestingly, the priority policy led to a very precise operationalisation of “target pupils” in which children and youngsters of immigrant origin were in fact being traced. Schools with large numbers of such pupils were accorded extra subsidies. As such, ethnic registration was already a fact of life in education in Flanders in the early 1990s, while similar monitoring remained impossible in other domains. In the operationalisation of “target pupils” – which boils down to ethnic registration – the scientific community played a considerable role. 7 In French-speaking Belgium, few systematic public
En savoir plus

19 En savoir plus

Le dispositif innovant, créateur d’interactions entre le public et la science dans le CCSTI

Le dispositif innovant, créateur d’interactions entre le public et la science dans le CCSTI

Page 90 sur 153 dans un coin...les gens ne viennent pas directement ici. » 1 il n’est pas visible, les personnes ne restent pas dans le hall, c’est un lieu de passage. Malgré cela, le public n’apparaît pas comme réfractaire à la technologie dans des lieux culturels, au contraire ! Les personnes interrogées lors d’entretiens, même si elles n’ont pas toutes un intérêt important pour les nouvelles technologies, trouvent que ce robot a sa place dans un lieu comme la Cité de l’espace car « on va à la Cité de l'espace […] pour essayer de nouvelles choses et pour apprendre de nouvelles choses. » 2 et puis « si on ne les [les nouvelles technologies] trouve pas là on les trouvera nulle part donc c'est un bon endroit. » 3 . Les CCSTI apparaissent comme un espace où tester la nouveauté qui n’est pas encore démocratisée. Ce n’est pas une attente, une demande du public mais la nouveauté ne les rebute pas et ne les choque pas. Finalement les nouvelles technologies ne semblent pas être aussi importantes aux yeux du public que ce que le milieu culturel et les concepteurs semblent le penser, mais par contre il suscite la curiosité. Il apparaît, aussi, que la manière d’amener l’information est plus séduisante, en tout cas pour les plus jeunes « mes neveux ils sont plus intéressés à voir des trucs comme ça plutôt que […] lire des pancartes » 4 . Mais finalement s’est plutôt le côté interactif, le côté actif qui apparaît comme intéressant par rapport à la passivité du texte. Cependant, on peut voir le lien qui est fait entre l’interactif et les enfants. On peut donc bien dire que, notamment, les enfants sont ciblés par ce type de dispositif.
En savoir plus

153 En savoir plus

Entre tension et engagement : la réception de la télé-réalité au sein d'un public de jeunes Québécoises

Entre tension et engagement : la réception de la télé-réalité au sein d'un public de jeunes Québécoises

The author and co-authors if applicable retain copyright ownership and moral rights in this document. Neither the whole thesis or dissertation, nor substantial extracts from it, may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author’s permission.

135 En savoir plus

Étude pour une bibliothèque de fantastique et science-fiction : missions, public, collection, moyens

Étude pour une bibliothèque de fantastique et science-fiction : missions, public, collection, moyens

theques membres du r£seau, de microfiches ou de photocopies des documents demand^s. - Eliminations: sans concurrencer le service de pr§t de la Bibliotheque nationale, la Bifansci pou[r]

62 En savoir plus

Aesthetic Engagement in the City

Aesthetic Engagement in the City

5. The senses and science A final example concerning atmospheric pollution demonstrates how the capacity of aesthetic engagement for enhancing the value of everyday experience is such that the scientific knowledge that might be associated with it is sometimes not even mentioned. The study in question was based on nearly sixty semi-structured interviews concerning ordinary residents' practices and representations with regard to air pollution in the eastern French city of Strasbourg. Half of the sample was composed of individuals suffering from asthma or allergies to grass pollen, following the principle of the "case-control" study widely used in epidemiology. Two interviews with heads of the local Association for the Monitoring and Study of Atmospheric Pollution (ASPA, the organization that officially monitors air quality in the Alsace Region), as well as a study of ASPA articles in the press, complemented the survey. These elements were then compared with measures of air quality indoors and outdoors carried out by physicians and chemists. The findings of this study may be summarized in three main points:
En savoir plus

10 En savoir plus

Public Health and Epidemiology Informatics: Recent Research Trends Moving toward Public Health Data Science

Public Health and Epidemiology Informatics: Recent Research Trends Moving toward Public Health Data Science

Also, as quoted by the survey paper of the Public Health and Epidemiology Informatics section of the 2020 International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Yearbook [16], the targeting of sub-populations for dedicated public health interventions is a growing subject of interest. Digital segmen- tation aims to reach audiences using digital technologies offering new opportunities to deliver appropriate prevention messages [17]. Several studies have already shown the interest of social media for public health campaigns such as smoking cessation [18]. A way to maximize their impact and efficiency could be to identify and target specific audi- ences. To do so, natural language processing, data mining, and machine learning have been used to classify user traits [19]. The strategy is similar to that of online targeted advertising except that the goal is to deliver dedicated public health, rather than advertising, mes- sages. The second selected best paper applied deep learning on satellite images to identify rural and hard-to-reach remote communities in low-income countries and help community health workers deliver health services [20]. The geographical segmentation of population based on their access to healthcare is needed to organize specific healthcare delivery and to reduce inequalities.
En savoir plus

5 En savoir plus

De l’intérêt des observatoires dans la résolution des conflits locaux : une approche en termes de science politique et de droit public

De l’intérêt des observatoires dans la résolution des conflits locaux : une approche en termes de science politique et de droit public

De l’intérêt des observatoires dans la résolution des conflits locaux : une approche en termes de science politique et de droit public Résumé Cet article se propose de décrire et d’analyser les motivations économiques qui sont liées à la conception et au fonctionnement des observatoires des pratiques agricoles, à partir du projet ANR Conception d’Observatoires des Pratiques Territorialisées (COPT), et d’en tirer quelques enseignements. Un observatoire est une unité de production d’informations et de connaissances, avec des fournisseurs de moyens techniques financiers et humains, de données et informations et des clients ou usagers publics et privés. Le premier obstacle à la création d’un observatoire est la difficulté de financer les investissements de départ pour des bénéfices qui sont espérés à moyen ou long terme. Le deuxième obstacle concerne le niveau de coopération entre les différents acteurs, les coûts et les bénéfices n’étant pas également distribués entre eux. Des interactions importantes existent entre observatoires et politiques publiques. En premier lieu, le mode de gouvernance de ces politiques peut encourager ou décourager l’intérêt pour les observatoires des pratiques agricoles. Les contrats basés sur des obligations de résultats en termes d’impacts environnementaux sont de nature à inciter les agriculteurs à accroître les connaissances sur les causalités entre leurs pratiques et ces impacts. Ce n’est cependant pas le cas pour la plupart des contrats actuels basés sur des obligations de moyens, dans ce cas les incertitudes sur ces causalités sont entièrement à la charge de l’Etat, qui est en conséquence peu incité à offrir des paiements élevés aux agriculteurs. Pour une meilleure efficacité environnementale et un partage des responsabilités, les observatoires, s’ils sont un lieu de négociation ouvert à tous les acteurs, sont un cadre opportun pour concevoir des contrats qui visent des obligations de résultat.
En savoir plus

41 En savoir plus

Interpretation in Science

Interpretation in Science

L’archive ouverte pluridisciplinaire HAL, est destinée au dépôt et à la diffusion de documents scientifiques de niveau recherche, publiés ou non, émanant des établissements d’enseignemen[r]

13 En savoir plus

Design and deploy : co-creative public transport planning using a web -based stakeholder engagement tool

Design and deploy : co-creative public transport planning using a web -based stakeholder engagement tool

To help the user better understand how to use CoAXs, we added a brand-new feature in the remote version - a learning module which includes a navigation bar to show which ste[r]

61 En savoir plus

Show all 10000 documents...