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Submitted on 27 Jan 2021

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The power-dual and the exponential-dual of a matrix

Alan Krinik, Gerardo Rubino

To cite this version:

Alan Krinik, Gerardo Rubino. The power-dual and the exponential-dual of a matrix. JMM 2021 -

Joint Mathematics Meeting, Jan 2021, Mountain / Virtual, United States. pp.1-28. �hal-03122300�

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

The power-dual and the exponential-dual of a matrix

A. Krinik, CalPoly, Pomona, US, and G. Rubino, Inria, Rennes, France

JMM 2021

Virtual world, Jan 7, 2021

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Talk’s content

1 Introduction Outline

2 Duality concepts Power-duals Exponential-duals

3 Back to general remarks

2 / 28

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Talk’s content

1 Introduction Outline

2 Duality concepts Power-duals Exponential-duals

3 Back to general remarks

3 / 28

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Outline

Original path

The problem addressed here is the derivation of closed formsof the solution tolinear systems of difference or differential equationswhich have

constant coefficients,

a “simple” or “regular” structure,

but thathave, in some cases, infinite size.

These types of systems appear in many areas, in particular in the transient analysis of Markovian queueing models.

We developed a methodology based on the concept of duality in Markov chains as proposed by Sigmund and developed by Anderson1, and used it on basic queueing models (M/M/1,M/M/1/H,M/M/1 andM/M/1/H with failures or catastrophes, etc.).

1Continuous-Time Markov Chains, W. J. Anderson, published by Springer in 1991 (out of press).

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Outline

Interest and extension

The goal of having closed forms is, obviously, toget insightinto the solution to the considered models.

This was the motivation with those stochastic models. Transient analysis is necessary today, for instance in telecommunications, to know what happens on short finite time intervals, and not only in equilibrium.

Later, we extended this duality idea toarbitrary differential systems, not necessarily coming from stochastic processes. This paper describes new work in this direction.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Outline

Using the dual to analyze Markovian queues

From a given Markov processX to analyze, living on the nonnegative integers, (i) we build a new one, its Anderson’s dual as we call it,X (if it exists, which is not always the case).

The transformation is linear (the generators are linearly related), and its main property is that the solutions to both systems are linearly related, and in the two directions: X →X andX→X.

Then, the idea is to (ii) find the transient distribution ofX, in general using Uniformization, to move to discrete time and thus analyzing the transient distribution of a Markov chain Y (typically counting paths by means oflattice path combinatoricstools).

To finish, (iii) we come back atX using the inverse dual (linear) transformation.

In cases with some regularity in the structure, this can produce closed-forms solutions, and it can also work when the dimension of the initial problem is infinite (e.g. for theM/M/1 queue).

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Outline

Comments

This procedure is useful when Xis easier to analyze, in a way or another.

As we see, there is an initial continuous time phase, then a discrete time part process, where a transient distribution is needed.

In some cases, we have a discrete time problem for which we look for transients from the beginning (instead of ODEs we have then difference equations).

In this talk we will briefly describe a general approach where transients in continuous time (algebraically speaking, matrix exponentials) or in discrete time (matrix powers) are needed. The former are built using the latter.

To simplify the discussion, we only present here in the finite case.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Talk’s content

1 Introduction Outline

2 Duality concepts Power-duals Exponential-duals

3 Back to general remarks

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Power-duals

The power-dual of a matrix

LetM be a square matrix (of reals, of complex numbers, ...) with dimensionn. Let us index it on{0,1, . . . ,n−1}. The power-dual of M is a new matrix that we denote hereM, with dimensione n+1 and indexed on{0,1, . . . ,n−1,n}, defined as follows:

Mei,j =











n−1X

k=i

Mj,k − Xn−1

k=i

Mj−1,k ifj ≤n−1, 1−

n−1X

k=0

Mn−1,k whenj =n,

whereM−1,k =0.

Example, dimension 2:

M = a b

c d

; Me =

a+b c+d− (a+b) 1− (c+d) b d−b 1−d

0 0 1

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks Power-duals

Example, dimension 3:

M =

1 −1 2

2 0 −2

1 −3 3

 ; Me =

2 −2 1 0

1 −3 2 1

2 −4 5 −2

0 0 0 1

A stochastic matrix:

P=

2/5 0 3/5

1/6 1/2 1/3

0 1/4 3/4

 ; Pe=

1 0 0 0

3/5 7/30 1/6 0

3/5 −4/15 5/12 1/4

0 0 0 1

;

as we see, in this case the power-dual is not a stochastic matrix;

Another stochastic matrix:

P=

2/5 3/5 1/6 5/6

; Pe=

1 0 0

3/5 1/15 1/3

0 0 1

;

here, the power-dual is also a stochastic matrix.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Power-duals

Some properties

IfMe is the power-dual of matrixM, then the sum of the elements of any row ofMb is 1,

and the last row is composed of 0s except for its last element=1.

Inversion Lemma: for 0≤i,j ≤n−1, we have Mi,j =

Xi k=0

Mej,k− Xi k=0

Mej+1,k.

Central result: For any two square matricesAandB with the same dimension, we have

ABf =BeA.e

Corollary: for any square matrixM and any nonnegative integer k, Mfk =Mek.

In words, the power-dual of thekth power ofM is thekth power of M’s power-dual.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Power-duals

Path

Instead of

M −→

counting paths, spectral analysis...

MH,

we can try M −→

(linear)

Me −→

counting paths, spectral analysis...

MeH=MgH −→

Inversion Lemma (linear)

MH

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Exponential-duals

The exponential-dual of a matrix

LetM be a square matrix (of reals, of complex numbers, ...) with dimensionn. Let us index it on{0,1, . . . ,n−1}.

The exponential-dual ofM is a new matrix that we denoteM, withb dimensionn+1 and indexed on{0,1, . . . ,n−1,n}, defined as follows:

Mbi,j = Xn−1 k=i

Mj,k− Xn−1 k=i

Mj−1,k, whereM−1,k =0.

Example, dimension 2:

M= a b

c d

; Mb =

a+b c+d− (a+b) −(c+d)

b d−b −d

0 0 0

We can observe that if we denote byW a square matrix with the same dimension as M, composed of 0s except the last column composed of 1s, then we have Mb =Me −W.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks Exponential-duals

Example, dimension 3:

M=

1 2 3

−1 2 −3

0 2 −2

 ; Me =

6 −8 2 0

5 −6 1 0

3 −6 1 2

0 0 0 0

An infinitesimal generator:

M=

−λ λ

µ −µ

; Me =

0 0 0

λ −(λ+µ) µ

0 0 0

;

as we see, the exponential-dual is also an infinitesimal generator;

Another infinitesimal generator:

M=

−3 1 2

6 −7 1

1 2 −3

 ; Me =

0 0 0 0

3 −9 5 1

2 −1 −4 3

0 0 0 0

;

here, the exponential-dual is not an infinitesimal generator.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Exponential-duals

Some properties

IfMb is the exponential-dual of matrixM, then the sum of the elements of any row ofMb is 0, and the last row ofMb is composed of 0s.

Inversion Lemma: 0≤i,j≤n−1, we have Mi,j =

Xi k=0

Mbj,k− Xi k=0

Mbj+1,k.

Important result: for any two square matricesAandB with the same dimension, we have

ABc =BbA.b

Corollary: for any square matrixM and any nonnegative integer k, Mck =Mbk.

In words, the exponential-dual of thekth power ofM is thekth power ofM’s exponential-dual.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks Exponential-duals

LetAandB be two square matrices with the same dimension, andα be a scalar. We have

A\+B=Ab+B,b αAc =αbA.

Let Mk

k≥0a matrix sequence, with Mk →M ask → ∞. Then, Mck →Mb ask → ∞.

IfP

k≥0Mk =M, then

X\

k≥0

Mk =X

k≥0

Mck =M.b

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Exponential-duals

Key result

LetM be an arbitrary square matrix. Using previous properties, eMtb =geMt.

In words, the exponential-dual of the exponential ofMt is the exponential of thepower-dual ofM timest.

This result explains how the evaluation of the power-dual appears when we work on matrix exponentials.

In this short presentation with skipped some technical results that are needed to prove previous theorem.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Exponential-duals

Path

Instead of

M −→ any algorithm

eMt, we can try

M −→

(linear)

Mb −→

any algorithm

eMtb =egMt −→

Inversion Lemma of power-dual

(linear)

eMt

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks Exponential-duals

Other general properties:

IfP is a stochastic matrix, then the first row ofPe is(1 0 0. . .0).

Recall thatPe need not be stochastic.

IfAis an infinitesimal generator, then the first row ofbAis

(0 0 0. . .0). Recall thatAb need not be an infinitesimal generator.

Connection with the dual of a Markov process as defined by Sigmund in 1976 and developed in Anderson’s book: ifAis the infinitesimal generator of Markov process X and ifAb is also an infinitesimal generator, the associated Markov processX is the dual ofX.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Talk’s content

1 Introduction Outline

2 Duality concepts Power-duals Exponential-duals

3 Back to general remarks

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Overview

This work generalizes the use of duality in the theory of Markov processes as proposed by Sigmund (see Anderson’s book). The dual doesn’t always exist.

In previous work we proposed to define what we call here exponential-dual, adopting a purely algebraic approach, when we realized that the stochastic framework was not necessary for the interest we had in the concept. Many proofs needed to be rewritten.

Here, we decompose explicitly the cases of discrete time and continuous time, and exhibit their connections, making the construction more complete and consistent.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

On dual’s existence (Markov processes)

This concerns the historical origin of this work, in the stochastic processes area.

For instance, consider an homogeneous “ring” illustrated here for 3 states:

1 2

X : 0

λ

λ λ

Whatever the size of the ring and the value ofλ, the associated Markov process has no dual (for those familiar with duality in Markov processes, the problem is the monotonicity condition impossible to satisfy here).

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Consider now the general Markov process with 3 states:

1 2

X: 0

Q1,2

Q2,1 Q1,0

Q0,1

Q0,2

Q2,0 0 1 2 3

dual ofX:

Q1,0−Q2,0

Q1,2−Q0,2

Q0,1+Q0,2

Q2,1+Q2,0

Q2,0

Q0,2

Here, the dual exists iffQ1,0>Q2,0 andQ1,2>Q0,2.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Zoomming on an example

Consider here theM/M/1/H queue plus “catastrophes” (or failures) as shown in the following Markovian graph:

0 1 2 · · ·· · ·· · · n n+1 · · ·· · ·· · · H

λ µ+γ

λ µ

λ µ

λ µ

λ µ

λ µ

λ µ γ

γ γ

γ

· · ·

· · ·· · ·

· · ·

· · ·

· · ·

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

TakeH=4, to shorten the slides. DenoteΛ=λ+µ+γ. We have

A=

−λ λ 0 0 0

µ+γ −Λ λ 0 0

γ µ −Λ λ 0

γ 0 µ −Λ λ

γ 0 0 µ −(µ+γ)

If we move to discrete time using Uniformization, the computation of eAt translates into that of evaluatingUk where using the notation p=λ/Λ,q=µ/Λ,r =γ/Λ,U=I−A/Λis

U =

q+r p 0 0 0 q+r 0 p 0 0 r q 0 p 0 r 0 q 0 p r 0 0 q p

The powers ofU are hard to obtain in closed-form here.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

If we use the exponential-dual (plus Uniformization), we must compute the powers of

P=

1 0 0 0 0 0

p 0 q 0 0 r

0 p 0 q 0 r

0 0 p 0 q r

0 0 0 p q+r r

0 0 0 0 0 1

Due to those ‘1’ at the corners, the use of lattice path combinatorics is much easier here than with matrixU of previous slide. That’s an example of situation where we can develop the process until its end.

The infinite case can also be solved in the same way.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

The formal solution of the ODEs (Chapman-Kolmogorov equations) is given below, using the notationρ=λ/µ, for the case of the queue starting empty at time 0 (the general case is similar while more complex):

pj(t) =πj−2µρj/2 H+1

X

1≤h≤H

e− λ+µ+γ−2p

λµcos hπ H+1

t

λ+µ+γ−2√

λµcos hπ H+1

×

×√ ρsin

hπ H+1

sin

jhπ H+1

−√ ρsin

(j+1)hπ H+1

.

In the formula,πj denotespj(∞)(steady-state), easy to evaluate symbolically.

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Introduction Duality concepts Back to general remarks

Thanks for your time.

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