Quality of life (MOS SF 36)

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Assessment of the psychosocial predictors of health-related quality of life in a PTSD clinical sample

Assessment of the psychosocial predictors of health-related quality of life in a PTSD clinical sample

1999; Mendlowicz & Stein, 2000; Olfson et al., 1997; Rapaport, Clary, Fayyad, & Endicott, 2005; Schneier, 1997; Stein, McQuaid, Pedrelli, Lenox, & McCahill, 2000). Measures of quality of life are increasingly used in health care studies as they provide a global assessment of the perceived burden associated with diverse conditions and are good predictors of future medical expenditures (Fleishman, Cohen, Manning, & Kosinski, 2006). As such, identifying the predictors of the quality of life of people diagnosed with PTSD could help understanding both the factors increasing their perceived burden and the health care cost of their condition. An increasing number of studies aimed at examining the nature of the burden associated with PTSD use assessments of health-related quality of life (HRQoL; Seedat, Lochner, Vythilingum, & Stein, 2006). The most widely used and recognized measure of HRQoL is the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36; Ware, Kosinski, & Keller, 1994; Ware, Snow, Kosinski, & Gandek, 1993). The SF-36 and its shorter version, the SF-12, are self-report questionnaires that assess physical and mental components of HRQoL. The SF-12 has been extensively validated both in epidemiological and in clinical studies (e.g., McHorney, Ware, & Raczek, 1993; Ware, Kosinski, & Keller, 1996) and was found to be an excellent predictor of future medical expenditures (Fleishman et al., 2006).
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Validation of a French Version of the Quality of Life “Celiac Disease Questionnaire”

Validation of a French Version of the Quality of Life “Celiac Disease Questionnaire”

GFD may have different effects in different countries, as diet styles may differ (i.e. the popularity of the French baguette in France). Patient-reported outcomes that capture self-perceived health concerns have become key measures over recent decades, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments are commonly used in epidemiology, clinical trials, and for routine follow-up of patients. However, only limited data are available describing the quality of life of patients with CD. Most previous studies used the generic medical outcome study short-form 36 items (MOS-SF36) [5] and reported that CD is detrimental for HRQoL and that this effect is reduced by a GFD [6–9]. In the study by O’Leary et al. [6] CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms had lower (worse) MOS-S36 scores both than those without and than patients who were following a GFD. In another study, unsatisfactory compli- ance with the GFD was found to be associated with a secondary deterioration of HRQoL [7]. In the study by Johnston et al. [8] patients with typical CD had significantly lower scores than controls for four out of the eight subscales of the MOS-SF36 (‘‘General Health’’ (GH), ‘‘Vitality’’ (VT), ‘‘Role emotional’’, and ‘‘Mental Health’’); the scores for two of these scales (GH and VT) improved significantly after one year on a GFD [8]. However, in contrast to these results, another study showed that despite strict adherence to GFD, ten years after diagnosis most patients failed to achieve a quality of life similar to that of the general population [9].
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Rural-urban disparity in oral health-related quality of life

Rural-urban disparity in oral health-related quality of life

3 INTRODUCTION Since Hippocrates introduced the concept of the effect of place on health 1 , research in various disciplines has been conducted to examine whether contextual and cultural characteristics of where people live, rather than compositional differences in individuals, can explain disparity in health outcomes 1-4 . In addition, various conceptual frameworks have been used to better understand the predictors of this disparity 2, 4-8 . Andersen’s behavioural model of health services utilization has been widely accepted as a predictive and explanatory model to evaluate the role of place in determining health and oral health outcomes 9 . According to this model, oral health outcome is a function of predisposing factors, enabling resources, and the need for dental care 9, 10 . It has been shown that contextual characteristics of geographical place can play a significant role in rural–urban general and oral health inequality 5, 11, 12 . The urban environment might mitigate the potential negative influence of rural environmental characteristics such as geographic remoteness, socioeconomic deprivation and inadequate access to oral health-care services and contribute to better oral health or oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) 13-19 . Research findings from different nations worldwide have shown that people living in rural areas are less satisfied with their oral health and have higher rates of untreated dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth loss 20-26 . Moreover, rural residents are less likely to engage in disease prevention and promotion of healthy behaviours, because there are fewer health information resources and inadequate health care provider counseling 27, 28 . According to the Canadian Community Health Survey (2001), rural residents had a lower rate of use of dental services than their urban counterparts 29 . Utilization of health care services is an important determinant of oral health but is far from equal, geographically. This disparity can be explained mainly by unequal distribution of health professionals, as well as inequitable and inadequate access to oral health care services in rural and remote zones 20, 30, 31 . In 2009–2010, about 90.3% of the dental workforce in the province of Quebec were located in urban areas, and only 0.3% of the total dental workforce maintained their practice in remote rural zones 32 . These variations may directly affect oral health, both in terms of morbidity and in perceived oral health.
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Survival and quality of life after extracorporeal life support for refractory cardiac arrest: A case series

Survival and quality of life after extracorporeal life support for refractory cardiac arrest: A case series

E D Abstract Objectives. Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS) is an emerging option to treat selected patients with cardiac arrest refractory to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Our primary objective was to determine the mortality at 30 days and at hospital discharge among adult patients receiving veno-arterial ECLS for refractory cardiac arrest. Our secondary objectives were to determine the one-year survival and the health-related quality-of-life, and to examine factors associated with 30-days mortality.

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Measuring the Impact of ICTs on the Quality of Life of Ageing People with Mild Dementia

Measuring the Impact of ICTs on the Quality of Life of Ageing People with Mild Dementia

{Mounir.Mokhtari, Romain.Endelin, Hamdi. Aloulou, Thibaut.Tiberghien Abstr act. The growing of ageing population worldwide and the need to focus research efforts on a specific target group motivate our research to focus on frail ageing people with chronic disease and physical/cognitive deficiencies. The primary goal is to enable the frail and dependant persons, through reliable assistive technologies, to maximize their physical and mental functions, and to continue to engage them in social networks, so that he can continue to lead an independent and purposeful life. Our target is to analyze the users’ habits at home through an extensive survey performed in France recently, and to design a suitable assistive system, which is mainly composed of devices available in the market. This research activity led to the deployment of a simplified hardware infrastructure (gateway, sensors, actuators) in the home of end-users with a limited number of wireless sensors, and to the outsourcing of all the software for data analysis in a framework running on a distant server. The research focuses on the quality of life of ageing people having cognitive and functional limitations, and on recent achievements realised in France and Singapore through several European and national projects, and through Quality of Life Chair (QoL) directed by Mounir Mokhtari and supported by two major health insurance companies in France, namely la Mutuelle Generale and REUNICA.
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Disability and quality of life in elderly people with diabetes.

Disability and quality of life in elderly people with diabetes.

Disability and quality of life in elderly people with diabetes Isabelle Bourdel-Marchasson1-2, Catherine Helmer3, Anne Fagot-Campagna4, Patrick Dehail1-5, Pierre-Alain Joseph6 HAL author[r]

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Beyond viral suppression of HIV – the new quality of life frontier

Beyond viral suppression of HIV – the new quality of life frontier

This is all well and good – and some elements of the WHO strategy might even be considered visionary in terms of how they seek to address the needs of PLHIV beyond viral suppression. Nevertheless, two issues have not been addressed. One is an explicit target for health- related quality of life – our proposed ‘fourth 90’. The other is policy and operational guidance for how to achieve the ‘fourth 90’. This shortcoming does not re- flect on WHO, but rather highlights the need for the global public health community as a whole to develop a new paradigm for ‘beyond viral suppression’. More pre- cisely, we need to reconsider the scope of the continuum-of-services paradigm, which has been an enormously useful approach to indicate where efforts should be concentrated in order to prevent fall-off along the continuum in specific national and sub-national con- texts. It is now time to add health-related quality of life of PLHIV to the continuum (Figs. 2 and 3).
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Reliability and validity of the Quality of Life Systemic Inventory for Children (QLSI-C): Preliminary result of a modular assessment tool of quality of life using e-Health technologies

Reliability and validity of the Quality of Life Systemic Inventory for Children (QLSI-C): Preliminary result of a modular assessment tool of quality of life using e-Health technologies

• Disease-specific measures are more specific and sensitive but they cannot be used to compare results across diseases or conditions (Guyatt & Jaeschke, 1990; Tian-hui, Lu, & Michael, 2005). The QLSI-C (Etienne, Dupuis, Spitz, Lemetayer & Missotten, 2011) is a quality of life assessment tool for children aged 8 to 12 years that uses a modular approach developed to overcome these shortcomings. Thus, the generic scale is accompanied by disease-specific modules

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Pépite | Improvement in quality of life after botulinum toxin injection for temporomandibular disorder

Pépite | Improvement in quality of life after botulinum toxin injection for temporomandibular disorder

Several lines of treatment have already been suggested for TMDs: pharmacological treatment, physiotherapy, behavioural approach, psychotherapy, occlusal splints, or surgical treatment [3]. At present, there is no consensus regarding the most effective treatment approach. Botulinum toxin is one of the treatment modalities proposed in literature. The painful and chronic characteristics of TMDs interfere with the quality of life (QoL) of patients [4]. Botulinum toxin has a double action on the neuromuscular junction: first, inhibition of acetylcholine release leads to degeneration of nerve endings and consequently paralysis; second, botulinum toxin decreases inflammatory pain by inhibiting substance P and glutamate release [5].
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Systematic review of quality of life measures in patients with endometriosis

Systematic review of quality of life measures in patients with endometriosis

Regidor et al. (1997) [ 45 ] also report use of a four- page self-developed questionnaire for evaluation of pain symptom recurrence and infertility treatment in patients with endometri- osis. It is available in English or German on request. Questions focus on occurrence of dysme- norrhea, dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain or premenstrual pain occurring during the follow- up period, in addition to collecting data on the time of first appearance and intensity of pain symptoms (mild, moderate or severe) after therapy.. The second part of the questionnaire focuses on infertility outcomes, including duration of infertility, type of stimulation therapy after GnRH-agonist treatment, pregnancy rate, whether spontaneous or under stimulation programs, and rates for birth, miscarriage and ectopic pregnancies. The author can also gather information, via a semiquantitative scale, on patient subjective feelings relating to benefits and regain in quality of life post- therapy, as well as adverse side effects of GnRH-agonist therapy. The last part of the questionnaire deals with documenting medical or surgical therapies as a result of recurrence of endometriosis. Though this questionnaire allows evaluation of symp- toms and HRQoL, the latter remains incomplete evaluation as only specifc areas are assessed.
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Clinical characteristics and quality of life in women with COPD: an observational study.

Clinical characteristics and quality of life in women with COPD: an observational study.

Our findings suggest that management of COPD should take psychological distress and socioeconomic status into account, particularly in women like those in our popula- tion, who were more unemployed than men and lived alone more. It is widely admitted in clinical practice that women feel uneasy about expectorating or eliminating sputum, or simply are unable to do so, but there is no published evidence. Among our COPD patients followed by specialists, there was the same proportion of patients with sputum in women and in men, while this is a key symptom of a lower quality of life mainly in women. Man- agement with physiotherapy could improve quality of life in such women.
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Systematic review of quality of life measures in patients with endometriosis

Systematic review of quality of life measures in patients with endometriosis

Regidor et al. (1997) [ 45 ] also report use of a four- page self-developed questionnaire for evaluation of pain symptom recurrence and infertility treatment in patients with endometri- osis. It is available in English or German on request. Questions focus on occurrence of dysme- norrhea, dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain or premenstrual pain occurring during the follow- up period, in addition to collecting data on the time of first appearance and intensity of pain symptoms (mild, moderate or severe) after therapy.. The second part of the questionnaire focuses on infertility outcomes, including duration of infertility, type of stimulation therapy after GnRH-agonist treatment, pregnancy rate, whether spontaneous or under stimulation programs, and rates for birth, miscarriage and ectopic pregnancies. The author can also gather information, via a semiquantitative scale, on patient subjective feelings relating to benefits and regain in quality of life post- therapy, as well as adverse side effects of GnRH-agonist therapy. The last part of the questionnaire deals with documenting medical or surgical therapies as a result of recurrence of endometriosis. Though this questionnaire allows evaluation of symp- toms and HRQoL, the latter remains incomplete evaluation as only specifc areas are assessed.
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Evaluation factors for determining the quality of life of physically independent elderly

Evaluation factors for determining the quality of life of physically independent elderly

Viviane de Souza Pinho Costa 1 , Mário Molari 2 , João Paulo Manfré dos Santos 3 , Eliane Regina Sernache de Freitas 3 , Rubens Alexandre da Silva Jr 1 , Karen Barros Parron Fernandes 4 ABSTRACT Introduction: Brazil has experienced an epidemiological transition process, characterized by an aging population, with a rise in chronic diseases and reduction in infectious diseases. In this context, aging brings about the presence of multimorbidities and the use of multiple drugs associated with a worse quality of life of those people. Objectives: To analyze the determinants of quality of life in physically independent elderly. Method: Cross-sectional study of 498 elderly physically independent, divided into three groups according to the presence of comorbidities: I) Control group: no comorbidities; II) Group comorbidities: <3 comorbidities; and III) multimorbidities Group: ≥ 3 comorbidities and were also stratified on the use of medications in: I) Control group: non-medicated; II) medicated Group: <3 drugs; and III) polymedicated Group: ≥ 3 drugs. Structured questionnaires were applied to survey data on socio-demographic characteristics, history of comorbidities and medication use, as well as the SF-36 questionnaire as a quality of life assessment method. Results: Statistically significant differences were found in the quality of life regarding gender, educational level, economic status and multimorbidities. The results show that in elderly populations there is inequality in non-white races and among women in matters regarding access to health services. These groups show bigger probability to have more serious chronic conditions and a bad perception of health and quality of life. It is also very clear that in third world countries, a lot of elderly live in poverty having difficulties in the area of health, a major challenge to the implementation of public policies for the care of those people. Lastly, the results make it evident that the aging process has a direct relationship to the amount of installed diseases and increased use of medications. Conclusion: As much as the results showed that the decline of quality of life in physically independent elderly is related to the presence of multimorbidities and high medication intake, researchers state that people can age with a good quality of life if they opt for a successful aging process where significant activities gain space along with daily actions.
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Validation of the nausea and vomiting of pregnancy specific health related quality of life questionnaire

Validation of the nausea and vomiting of pregnancy specific health related quality of life questionnaire

Generic quality of life For comparison purposes, the generic health-related QOL was measured with the standard version (past 4 weeks) 12-item Short-Form Health Survey v.1 (SF-12) [15]. This shorter version of the commonly used SF-36 yields two summary measures: the physical component summary scale (PCS) and the mental component summary scale (MCS)[16]. Summary measures range from 0 to 100 and are calculated using the scores of the twelve items; higher scores represent better QOL. PCS and MCS scores were calculated with standard (United States) scoring algo- rithms and normalised using the US general population (mean, 50; SD, 10). The psychometric properties of the SF-12 questionnaire have been extensively evaluated in many different populations [15,17-19]. In fact, the SF-12 is highly reliable (test-retest correlations PCS = 0.86–0.89; MCS = 0.76–0.77)[15,20] and has shown a very good cri- terion validity as compared to the gold standard of health- related QOL, the SF-36 (PCS = 0.90–0.96; MCS = 0.93– 0.97) [15,19].
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Neurosurgery in Parkinson's disease: Social adjustment, quality of life and coping strategies*

Neurosurgery in Parkinson's disease: Social adjustment, quality of life and coping strategies*

Some studies combine the assessment of health-related quality of life with that of coping strategies. However, while some have stated that stimulated patients do act differently from non-stimulated Parkinson’s disease pa- tients [23, 33] in terms of coping strategies, the link between health-related quality of life and coping strategies in the context of neurosurgery is not clear. One particular diffi- culty is that very few studies (n = 3) have tackled this fundamental issue [23, 31, 33] , hence raising a secondary problem regarding the type of scale used to measure coping strategies. Indeed, while there are a number of existing scales [28-29] , each does not investigate the same dimensions, therefore underlining a problem of reliability for these few studies, and more importantly raising the question as to what is measured exactly and how to go about such measurement. Moreover, the most widely used measurement scales have been generic in nature, whereas the specificity of neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease requires a more specific approach. As initially attempted by Montel & Bungener [30] by vali- dating the CHIP scale for the assessment of coping in a neurological context, it may prove interesting to elabo- rate a Parkinson’s disease-specific coping scale which is not only better adapted to the characteristics of this neurological pathology but also to the specificity of sub- thalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Thus, it is cur- rently difficult and certainly premature to generalize the few data concerning coping strategies and neurosurgery, and more importantly to postulate any link between cop- ing and health-related quality of life in the context of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Further stu- dies on this topic are clearly necessary and should prove valuable in clarifying current knowledge.
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Physical occupational exposures during working life and quality of life after labour market exit: results from the GAZEL study.

Physical occupational exposures during working life and quality of life after labour market exit: results from the GAZEL study.

Dangerous and strenuous working conditions influence healththrough a variety of pathways. Safety hazards may influence subsequent health through the long-term impact of injuries while health hazards may result in occupational illness(Levy, Wegman, Baron, & Sokas, 2011, p. 5). Biomechanical health hazards or ergonomic straincause long-term and painful musculoskeletal disorders (Descatha et al., 2011; Leclerc, Tubach, Landre, & Ozguler, 2003; Plouvier, Leclerc, Chastang, Bonenfant, & Goldberg, 2009; Plouvier, Renahy, Chastang, Bonenfant, & Leclerc, 2008),while chemical health hazards are likely to influence later health as a result of causing cancer ordisabling and often irreversible respiratory illness (Ahasic&Christiani, 2011, p. 398; Berr et al., 2010; Imbernon et al., 1995; Lundberg, Hemmingsson, & Hogstedt, 2007, p. 13; Martin, Imbernon, Goldberg, Chevalier, & Bonenfant, 2000). However, it is not known to what extent the health effects of earlier working conditions affect ind ividuals’ chances of enjoying good quality of life following retirement.
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Quality of Life and Attractiveness of Small Towns: A Comparison of France and Poland

Quality of Life and Attractiveness of Small Towns: A Comparison of France and Poland

Place attractiveness and quality of life issues As pointed by Niedomysl (2010: 97), “The at- tractiveness of places is currently gaining a high policy salience in policymakers’ efforts to draw mobile capital”. In fact, many studies, either em- pirical or theoretical, have been conducted in or- der to estimate or evaluate place attractiveness. There is a frequent confusion between attractive- ness and competitiveness as many researches are made from economic perspectives. The focus is often on production factors and space opportu- nities in order to attract firms, investors or quali- fied workforce. Studies on “creative cities” have shown the importance of space amenities and in- frastructures in order to attract well-educated ac- tive people, the so-called “creative class” (Florida 2002). Urban performance currently depends not only on a city’s endowment with hard infrastruc- ture (‘physical capital’), but also on the availabili-
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Quality of life in multiple sclerosis: translation in French Canadian of the MSQoL-54

Quality of life in multiple sclerosis: translation in French Canadian of the MSQoL-54

Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) questionnaires are increasingly used in international clinical trials. The cultural adaptation of an HRQoL questionnaire is a rigor- ous and complex process [31,34]. The main objective is to obtain a conceptual equivalence between the original and translated versions, allowing, among other things, a pool- ingand comparison of international studies data. This incremental methodological approach has become essen- tial as increasing amounts of data are collected about cul- tural differences in measuring quality of life as well as the different types of equivalence between cultures [35]. The translation of the MSQOL-54 in French Canadian was carried out within the confines of internationally accepted methodologies under the supervision of experts in the field of cultural adaptation [29,30]. Instructions and Items 38, 43, 45 and 49 were the most debated. Problem- atic issues mainly resided in the field of semantics. As suggested by Ware et al [20], HRQoL questionnaires can form a practical tool for directly linking the norms from large population surveys with the results from more focused clinical trials, outcomes research studies, and monitoring efforts in everyday clinical practice. Patients have reported that information from assessments helped guide discussions about treatment options and care plan- ning, thereby improving communication with health care providers [36]. It has been suggested in the extent litera- ture on doctor-patient relationships that the clinical appli- cation of HRQoL instruments helps to open the lines of communication between doctors and patients [37]. It sig- nals to the patient that his or her doctor is prepared to dis- cuss a wide range of health related issues thereby allowing them to relay details surrounding their condition that might otherwise remain unspoken. In addition, these dis- cussions help patients feel understood both physically and emotionally. Of course, the use of HRQOL question- naires can never substitute for the natural dynamics of doctor-patient communication and interaction. It can, however, be viewed as a valuable tool for structuring the information gathering process. For these reasons, the French Canadian MSQOL-54 can be considered as a use-
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Symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse at midlife, quality of life, and risk factors.

Symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse at midlife, quality of life, and risk factors.

Table 2 Multiple regression analysis of the association between overall quality of life, measured by the NHP global score, and the frequency of pelvic prolapse symptoms, self-reported nervous breakdown, self reported depressed mood anxiety or stress, back pain, urge urinary incontinence, fewer than 3 bowel movements a week, regular physical exercise, hysterectomy, neurologic disease, regular medical treatment, BMI, living with someone, occupation, monthly income. The other variables tested (age, high school diploma, smoking, menopausal status, parity, previous urinary incontinence surgery, previous POP surgery, previous anal surgery, stress urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, urinary infection, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) were not significant and were excluded from the final model.
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View of Intensive Care Impact on the Future Quality of Life of Handicapped Patients

View of Intensive Care Impact on the Future Quality of Life of Handicapped Patients

Keywords Quality of life · Handicap · Independence Introduction Nous savons qu ’un séjour en réanimation peut être source de handicap, soit parce qu ’une pathologie grave ou un accident touchant en particulier le système nerveux peut laisser des déficiences importantes, soit parce que la prise en charge et la suppléance des défaillances viscérales vont nécessiter des thérapeutiques médicamenteuses ou technologiques agressi- ves potentiellement sources de séquelles fonctionnelles, voire psychologiques [1]. Il a été rapporté ainsi sur des séries de patients survivants de SDRA une restriction des perfor- mances fonctionnelles et de la qualité de vie à cinq ans [2]. Il est difficile de connaître chez des patients, avec déjà une autonomie limitée, l ’impact de la réanimation, ce d’autant que leur qualité de vie est souvent sous-estimée et que les échelles de qualité de vie génériques s ’appliquent mal [3]. Cette évaluation devrait se baser sur des échelles spécifiques comme cela a pu être développé dans les maladies neuro- musculaires [4].
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