ICT and learning

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E-Learning culture : operationalization of a systemic model to support ICT-Integration in pre-service teacher trainers’ practice

E-Learning culture : operationalization of a systemic model to support ICT-Integration in pre-service teacher trainers’ practice

43 process presented in combination with the implementation of an assessment model chosen, had a positive impact on the development of pre-service teachers’ ICT-TPCK knowledge. Their ICT–TPCK 9 competence (evaluated following three forms of assessment: expert assessment, peer assessment, and self-assessment) significantly improved over the course of a semester. In terms of restructuring old teaching practices, results also showed that teachers must be trained in powerful learning environments where teaching is situated in real and authentic tasks, and in ways where teachers themselves constitute a part of a larger learning and professional community for the purpose of exchanging perspectives, resolving dilemmas, and confronting uncertainty in transforming classroom practice. Based on evidence from their empirical investigation, the authors concluded that TPCK is a unique body of language constructed from interaction of its individual contributing Knowledge (K) bases (i.e. Pedagogical (P), Technological (T), and Content (C)) and where the mere development of one or more of its knowledge bases does not guarantee and does not imply concurrent development of ICT-TPCK. In their research, it was emphasized that ICT–TPCK is what makes a teacher competent to design technology-enhanced learning. It can be described as the ways knowledge about tools and their affordances, pedagogy, content, learners, and context are synthesized into an understanding of how particular topics that are difficult to be understood by learners or difficult to be presented by teachers can be transformed and taught more effectively with technology in ways that signify its added value.
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Investigating the Use of ICT and its Role in EFL Learning and Teaching The Case Study of Master One Students and Teachers at Mostaganem University of AbdelhamidIbnBadis

Investigating the Use of ICT and its Role in EFL Learning and Teaching The Case Study of Master One Students and Teachers at Mostaganem University of AbdelhamidIbnBadis

Abstract Information and Communication Technology (ICT), in the field of education as a useful modern means , has taken a tremendous part in learning foreign languages. Therefore, in EFL learning and teaching, ICT is being used as a main tool that enables successful and interesting language learning and teaching. The present research work aims at investigating the use of ICT and its role in both English learning and teaching at university. This study attempts to explore how impactful ICT use is in classrooms, and its effect on the process of English learning and teaching, as well as, EFL students‟ and teachers‟ different attitudes towards ICT‟s implementation in class and to identify the difficulties which EFL learners face when they do not use it. In that sense, the study hypothesises that ICT as a teaching/learning device may facilitate the process as it enhances students‟ performance in class; mainly in listening and speaking skills, it motivates them and increases their interest towards courses. Without ICT, students face difficulties. In order to reach our study, the research is conducted both quantitatively and qualitatively. Accordingly, these two methods are adopted in order to validate or falsify the suggested hypotheses. The study opted for two different tools: a questionnaire and an interview, and the samples were M1 EFL students and teachers from different specialities selected randomly in the department of English at University of AbdelhamidIbnBadis in Mostaganem. The findings of this study show that EFL students and teachers support the use of ICT in classroom as a practical and multipurpose tool for teaching and learning. It introduces innovation and facilitates the way of learning and teaching, besides having a constructive effect on their performance.
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Research on ICT with Aboriginal Communities: Report from RICTA 2005

Research on ICT with Aboriginal Communities: Report from RICTA 2005

Like Six Nations, local entrepreneurs in the north are taking their IT skills learned in the south and returning to their home communities where they are working as consultants and IT technicians. RICTA meeting participant Jesse Fiddler took his family home to Sandy Lake First Nation after living in the south for almost ten years working for Knet Services and studying computer science at university. Like a growing number of employees who avoid daily commutes to the city, many Aboriginal people are learning they can return to their home communities and take their IT skills and jobs with them. At least one employee of the Keewaytinook Okimakanak has returned to her home community but continues to work full time for the tribal council using IT. This
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Work towards automated vendor-neutral certification of ICT skills

Work towards automated vendor-neutral certification of ICT skills

One of the first tasks for Author was to extract and edit from the goal a description that helps the candidates to appreciate the learning goal they face if they want to pass the certificate exam. This description will be accompanied by a representative set of exam items that the candidates can view using a module of the exam software. Further preparation of the candidate falls within the scope of the Train2Cert project [Train2Cert], the sister project of InCert.

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Creation, animation and perennial activities of Communities of Practice supported by ICT

Creation, animation and perennial activities of Communities of Practice supported by ICT

thematic groups as (potential) communities of practice inside the larger form@HETICE network. In 2007, some members were convinced of the potentiality of the PALETTE services to capitalise and share knowledge, so they built with the help of a mediator the ontology of the CoP [28] who let it validate by other members and began to classify the form@HETICE resources. Around three hundred were selected and uploaded on the BayFac service. The use of facets permitted to classify and retrieved them. This system replaced the archives and was available via the form@HETICE website. It had not a great success among the community but the resources were present when needed. Finally, the BayFac was not available any more in 2011. The team decided then to give online access to the resources from its website. The work done before was reinvested and updated. Internal resources have now migrated and are classified with the help of the Diigo service. Some specific resources are also available from a web page of the form@HETICE website, taking into account the category of activity (conferences, plenary meetings and training sessions). There is also a platform (Netvibes) devoted to the topics that can interest the CoP. So a step was taken by the team to adopt such kinds of services. It takes time to appropriate them and to give sense to this kind of practice. That is why activities like meetings, edition of the newsHETICE… can sustain the development and sharing of new practice. That is always the members who decide whether they will adopt or not what they discover. One more time, the usability of different tools (e.g. Amaya) or services (e.g. SweetWiki) were not estimated sufficient to motivate them to use them regularly even if they were innovative and promising. Some topics of interested remain, other evolve. For instance, the CoP members are still interested in the exploitation of e-learning platforms, in legal and ethics problems related to that, in the creation of scenarios integrating ICT… That is why the form@HETICE team does not only propose meetings
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ICT and education : a critical role in human and social development

ICT and education : a critical role in human and social development

The fourth paper in this issue, written by Negash Solomon is entitled “Learning Assessment of a Videoconference-based Training: Lessons from medical training between US and Ethiopia”. The main research question guiding this study was whether videoconferencing can serve as an effective medium to facilitate training programs conducted between high and low-income countries? To address this issue, the authors focused on a two-way videoconferencing training program conducted between the US and Ethiopia. Specifically, four videoconference locations in the US were connected to a similar center in Ethiopia in order to provide high level HIV/AIDS medical management training to Ethiopian medical professionals. In the context of developing countries, this paper raises an interesting and relevant issue: given that knowledge experts are typically concentrated in high- income countries, how can we increase the knowledge of medical professionals in underserved communities through a videoconference-based training? In the health sector, ICT can be a cornerstone for efficient and effective services. Over the last decade, the need to develop and organize new ways of providing health services has been accompanied by major advances in ICT, enabling better support for health services and systems and simultaneously improving global awareness of health issues. As a consequence, the World Bank and UNESCO have insisted on member nations developing long term e-health strategies. In the context of underserved countries, this approach can potentially solve problems such as the shortage of skills of health professionals and the training of medical workers. The results of this study indicate that the videoconference-based training had a positive impact on Ethiopian physicians’ attitudes and resulted in significant learning gains. It shows that videoconference-based training can bridge the knowledge gap in low-income countries by linking them with high-income countries and may become the catalyst for developing advanced telemedicine services. Nevertheless, while this potential is apparent, it is not yet clear whether it can be realized in an environment in which there are human resource constraints at both the sending and receiving sites. This study also identified constraining and promoting factors of the videoconference-based training. The paper concludes with three lessons learned in the following three areas: cultural context, IT infrastructure, and sustainable community. Each lesson has implications for research and practice.
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Cops’ creation and evolution sustained by ICT tools and services

Cops’ creation and evolution sustained by ICT tools and services

The evolution of the CoPs’ members’ representations and practices was observed through answers to a questionnaire (before and after the activities), the individual logbooks weekly handled by the participants, interviews and their productions. First, we observed that the use of several tools or services allows the members to become more competent in the domain of the ICT in terms of practices and technological literacy. They discover more transverse functions through the tools and feel more comfortable when using new interfaces. This also decreases fears of certain members who had negative representations regarding ICT. Then, the scenarios concretely offered to the CoPs’ members to live collaborative activities supported by ICT artefacts. They could exchange ideas, resources and knowledge. These experiments enabled them to refine their representations about collaborative learning and to get reference tools to support their future activities. They declared the use of these artefacts allowed the emergence of a CoP but also the development of the feeling of belonging to a CoP. The tasks realization during the trials created some common interests between the members. For many of them it was their first experiment in collaborative edition. They learned favourable modes and codes to produce and exchange when carrying on this kind of task. They also perceived the importance of the role of a CoP animator. As for the production of documents, the discovery of several new tools allowed the CoPs’ members to compare them with different editors and examine their advantages and disadvantages. Even if the tools were not still or sufficiently accepted and adopted by the members, this comparison allowed a certain awareness of the importance of standards, exchangeable documents and durability of data.
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The Teacher's Role and the Students' Autonomy under the LMD and the Integration of ICT

The Teacher's Role and the Students' Autonomy under the LMD and the Integration of ICT

11. Conclusion On the basis of the data we have collected from the majority of EFL teachers through a questionnaire, we deduce that using ICT impels and motivates teachers and learners to be successfully autonomous, their love of curiosity, creativity under LMD in terms of getting a wide range of instructions and language forms to be in contact with society. So, the modern relationship between the teacher and the students in the classroom as being observed when using ICT as a motivating tool contributes to enhancing the teaching and learning process on the one hand and making modern teaching learners-centred on the other hand. In other words, modernity in teaching helps both teachers and students to engage in various social, cultural and scientific activities and then it prepares them for a professional life. Moreover, it provides all kinds of opportunities to make learners as well as teachers efficient in society.
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Current trends on ICT technologies for enterprise information s²ystems

Current trends on ICT technologies for enterprise information s²ystems

Enterprise learning is increasingly benefitting from technological solutions supporting informal, everyday and on-the-job training (OJT) in order to develop both individual staff competences as well to upgrade the overall human resources competence affordances level of the organization. OJT is highly effective as it contextualizes in practice the learning experience, facilitating the cognitive process of learning by aligning the learners’ mindset with the context of the training task under consideration. Nonetheless, the involved costs in OJT can be significantly high. Augmented reality supported training has been employed as a more-cost efficient alternative, although it is typically more applicable to specialized training, such as maintenance training, (Besbes et al. 2012; Haritos and Macchiarella 2005; Jee et al. 2011; Nakajima and Itho 2003; Platonov et al. 2006; Savioja et al. 2007; Schwald and Laval 2003; Toro et al. 2007; Yamabe and Nakajima 2012) and involves relatively high costs if it were to be made more broadly applicable. Earlier technology-enhanced learning (TEL) support has been delivered primarily in the form of e- learning and web-based learning (Rolstadas 2013). More recently, the TEL tools portfolio is rapidly expanding to make more efficient joint use of learning concepts, methodologies and technological enablers to achieve more direct, effective and lasting learning impact. Employing virtual learning environments (VLE), trainees are empowered to follow their own training pace, learning topics and assessment tests that fit their needs (Emmanouilidis 2009; Papathanasiou et al. 2013). Training can become ubiquitous through mobile learning (Hung and Zhang 2011; Mierlus-Mazilu 2010; Papathanasiou et al. 2014). The spread of use of social networking tools has also brought attention to the contribution of social and groupware learning (Casagranda et al. 2011; Westerhout et al. 2011).
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Regulation and competition policy in the ICT sector : essays in industrial organization

Regulation and competition policy in the ICT sector : essays in industrial organization

the market, imputation tests using the dynamic approach seem to be preferable. Indeed, a failure to pass the period-by-period imputation test might not indi- cate a margin squeeze conduct, but rather a penetration pricing strategy (when price increases over time). This is especially so when the product in question is characterized by network externalities and consumers find greater value in the product when the penetration rate is higher. Similarly, discounts and promotions or learning-by-doing effects related to new services favor imputation tests using the dynamic approach. As Spector [2008] puts it, “[l]ow introductory downstream prices may have innocent motives because both producers and consumers in new markets need to gain experience, and costs can usually be expected to decrease.” However, there are shortcomings in the dynamic approach. For instance, an imputation test may rely on unreasonable cost and demand forecasts. Besides, a positive net present value for the incumbent could be the result of a successful foreclosure strategy, as the dynamic approach would allow for the recoupment of initial losses induced by a predatory strategy. 1 Even so, all things considered,
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Pedagogical Integration of ICT: Successes and Challenges from 100+ African Schools

Pedagogical Integration of ICT: Successes and Challenges from 100+ African Schools

Pedagogical.Integration.of.ICT. A cursory glance of the ICT scenario in Kenya shows that computers have found their way into schools either through donations or direct purchase by the school management. The findings from ten selected educational institutions that participated in the study on Pedagogical Integration of ICT in Education in Africa indicate that schools are at different stages in the integration of ICT in the teaching and learning process. There is an apparent difference between private and public schools and rural and urban schools. Some of the private schools seem to have a deliberate policy for integration of ICT in teaching and learning. In such schools, inclusion of ICT in the teaching process is a means for attracting and retaining learners as it is considered an added value. However, in public schools where the School Principal offers clear leadership in use and investment in ICT skills and infrastructure, there is greater integration of ICT. The data also shows that urban-based schools integrate ICT more than rural based schools. This is due to better infrastructure and training facilities. The lack of integration, despite having equipment, suggests a lack of clear policy or will to integrate ICT. The differences observed, therefore, appear to revolve around ownership of the school, location of the school, professional training of the teachers that included ICT and ICT skills of the school manager. It is notable that, when the school manager is conversant with ICT, they encourage its use in many areas including teaching and learning irrespective of whether the government has given a clear policy or not. This underscores the importance of leadership in implementing change.
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Relating ICT Competencies with Personality Types

Relating ICT Competencies with Personality Types

3.2 A Case Study A Software Engineering Master Degree The Master program called “Software Engineering by Immersion” provided software engineering learning by doing, with a long-term project as the foundation of all ap- prenticeships. Young engineers made up teams of 6; each team was led by one asso- ciate professor acting as project manager. The field of the study is to observe two teams graduated in 2006 and 2007 and led by one of the authors. We choose this sam- ple set because graduates had completed a free MBTI test at Master studies time that was used to help to define teams’ composition. Participants were aware of MBTI
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Pedagogical Integration of ICT: Successes and Challenges from 100+ African Schools

Pedagogical Integration of ICT: Successes and Challenges from 100+ African Schools

Pedagogical.Integration.of.ICT. A cursory glance of the ICT scenario in Kenya shows that computers have found their way into schools either through donations or direct purchase by the school management. The findings from ten selected educational institutions that participated in the study on Pedagogical Integration of ICT in Education in Africa indicate that schools are at different stages in the integration of ICT in the teaching and learning process. There is an apparent difference between private and public schools and rural and urban schools. Some of the private schools seem to have a deliberate policy for integration of ICT in teaching and learning. In such schools, inclusion of ICT in the teaching process is a means for attracting and retaining learners as it is considered an added value. However, in public schools where the School Principal offers clear leadership in use and investment in ICT skills and infrastructure, there is greater integration of ICT. The data also shows that urban-based schools integrate ICT more than rural based schools. This is due to better infrastructure and training facilities. The lack of integration, despite having equipment, suggests a lack of clear policy or will to integrate ICT. The differences observed, therefore, appear to revolve around ownership of the school, location of the school, professional training of the teachers that included ICT and ICT skills of the school manager. It is notable that, when the school manager is conversant with ICT, they encourage its use in many areas including teaching and learning irrespective of whether the government has given a clear policy or not. This underscores the importance of leadership in implementing change.
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Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Remote and Rural First Nations Communities : An Overview

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Remote and Rural First Nations Communities : An Overview

One not able example of communit y-based learning on t his model is Keewayt inook Int ernet High School (KiHS), an innovat ive program servicing schools in remot e First Nat ions communit ies in nort hern Ont ario. Pot t er (2010) and Walmark (2010) out line how KiHS provides a communit y-based educat ional opt ion f or First Nat ions high school st udent s t hrough t he use of int ernet t echnologies. St udent s who remain in t heir home communit ies may access a qualit y high school program t hrough KiHS while part icipat ing in communit y lif e. KiHS st udent s earn minist ry-inspect ed credit s t owards t heir Ont ario Secondary School Diploma at t he int ermediat e and senior levels, and experience lif e in a high school set t ing. KiHS gives parent s and communit ies an opport unit y t o act ively part icipat e in t he educat ional experience of t heir children t hrough local involvement in t he program. Since 2003, Keewayt inook Okimakanak’ s K-Net support ed t he development and delivery of t he Grade 7 and 8 Online Supplement ary courses in lit eracy, numeracy and science (www. ned. ca). The original goal of t he program was t o prepare st udent s f or cont inuing t heir high school program wit hin t he KIHS program. Over t he years t his program became a prof essional development and social net working service f or First Nat ion t eachers and st udent s as well as a complement ary resource f or First Nat ion schools st ruggling t o provide a qualit y educat ion program f or senior element ary school st udent s.
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Is spatial information in ICT data reliable?

Is spatial information in ICT data reliable?

II STUDY AREA AND DATA DESCRIPTION We focus here on the region of Dakar, Senegal. The mobile phone data consists in call de- tail records (CDR) of phone calls and short messages exchanged by more than 9 million of anonymized Orange’s customers. They were collected in Senegal in 2013, and were released to research teams in the framework of the 2014 Orange Data for Development challenge (de Mon- tjoye et al., 2014). We will use for our study the second dataset (SET2) that was made available by Orange. It contains fine-grained location data on a rolling 2-week basis at the individual level. For each of the 25 two-week periods, a sample of about 300, 000 mobile phone users is selected at the country scale. Whenever one of these individuals uses his/her mobile phone during the two-week period, the time and his/her position (at the level of serving cell tower) is recorded. This information can be used to study human activity and mobility patterns in the region of Dakar that is here divided into 457 spatial subunits. The partition is the Voronoi tes- sellation constructed from the location of antennas in the city chosen as nodes. Each Voronoi cell approximates thus the activity zone served by the antenna located at its center (see Figure 1a).
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Smart Grid Futures: Perspectives on the Integration of Energy and ICT Services

Smart Grid Futures: Perspectives on the Integration of Energy and ICT Services

At the heart of a demand-responsive smart-grid is the dynamic nature of generation and consumption patterns, as well as their organization and asset boundaries, which is where the traditional closed-loop, centralized energy management infrastructure becomes inadequate. The uni-directional flow of electricity; i.e., generation → transportation → distribution → usage, is increasingly being replaced by bi- directional flows where consumers consume and produce electricity [3] – often simultaneously. Widespread integration of distributed energy resources (DER) such as wind farms and photovoltaic (PV) systems will add further challenges, requiring smart management and high-resolution monitoring at all levels to enable the coordination of bi-directional flows so as to ensure the quality of supply (QoS) and balance out supply, demand and storage [4]. The vision of the wider integration DERs is also a prerequisite for efficient use of energy at the consumer level through intelligent demand response [5]. Distributed and intelligent grid is becoming a reality for most European nations; e.g. Germany intends to cease nuclear generation of electricity by 2022 and will increasingly rely on renewable energy resources – it has long planned to cease fossil fuel based electricity generation by 2050 [4].
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Spatial uncertainty propagation in ICT data analysis

Spatial uncertainty propagation in ICT data analysis

Maxime Lenormand, Thomas Louail, Marc Barthélemy, J.J.. Ramasco.[r]

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International Competitiveness in the Telecommunications and ICT Sectors: A Cross-Country Comparison

International Competitiveness in the Telecommunications and ICT Sectors: A Cross-Country Comparison

Despite the positive economic contribution of ICTs, many developing and Arab countries are remarkably very slow to use it and adopt it in government and business. The current figures of ICT growth reflect activity by 5% of the world's population. This is particularly striking since the figures show that even for basic services such as telephone and electricity, 70% of the world population has never used a telephone while more than two billion people lack the basic service of electricity. To be effective and capable to use the ICTs a country must have an efficient telecommunications environment and a population with the necessary skills (education, literacy, technical, legislative, etc.) and knowledge. Most Arab countries have a large percentage of young but most of them are unskilled workers. By western standards, women in most Arab countries are marginalized (women constitute 28 percent of the total labour force in the MENA region, the lowest level of female labour force participation in the world) and their contribution to the economic system is negligible. Literacy rates are relatively low despite the recent progress in many Arab countries lately.
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Community Media and Networking and ICT

Community Media and Networking and ICT

analyzing democratic media activism in Canada (Carroll and Hackett, 2006). Despite the title of his last book, Challenging Codes: Collective action in the Information Age, Melucci does not analyse the Internet. Social movements, Melucci believes, have the power to reverse the symbolic order, through their alternative use of symbolic codes. Alternative media, including "music, bodily signals and clothing, radios and images, theatre and art, communication networks and virtual reality," can be used to alter and evade the codes imposed by mass society. Melucci believes that messages produced by social movement actors help the social movements to articulate and publicise to the rest of society the themes they consider important, and to enable political actors to receive the movements' messages more clearly. Cultural practices common within social movements - ranging from dissemination of alternative information to consciousness- raising and forms of psychotherapy - help maintain the movement, by providing alternative forms of self-understanding, friendship networks guaranteeing contact with sympathetic individuals, and many opportunities for friendship.
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Learning in games via reinforcement learning and regularization

Learning in games via reinforcement learning and regularization

OMD schemes, Kwon and Mertikopoulos [ 33 ] recently showed that a unilateral vari- ant of the reinforcement learning dynamics studied in this paper leads to no regret against any (locally integrable) stream of payoffs. Our analysis relies heavily on tools from convex analysis and, in particular, the theory of Bregman functions ( Bregman [ 11 ]). Returning to the case of the replicator dynamics, it is well known that the Kullback–Leibler (KL) divergence (an oriented distance measure between probability distributions) is a potent tool for understanding the dynamics’ long-run behavior (see Weibull [ 59 ] and Hofbauer and Sigmund [ 26 ]). For other steep cases, this part can be played by the Bregman divergence, a distance-like function whose role in population dynamics was noted recently by Harper [ 22 ]. 4 In the nonsteep regime however, the dynamics of mixed
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