Communication and Dissemination

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Large scale model for information dissemination with device to device communication using call details records

Large scale model for information dissemination with device to device communication using call details records

have been the focus of a lot of studies. Through this paper, we study the dissemination of public safety information at country scale. For the type of communication network, as a case study, we choose Device to Device (D2D) communication paradigms. This choice relates to the fact that the market of context-aware applications and location-based services has grown tremendously and operators have started to consider the deployment of D2D communica- tions as an underlay to the cellular networks. D2D communication is defined as a short range communication between devices in physical proximity without any involvement of the network infrastructure. D2D has many advantages like, autonomous communication, improved performance and spectrum reuse, low energy consumption and reduced load on the infrastructure. Moreover, other benefits of D2D communication include direct communication between devices even when the traditional infrastructure is down, better connectivity in poor connectivity regions and increased average rate of successful message delivery. These above mentioned benefits of D2D motivate us to choose D2D communi- cation paradigms as a Use Case. Nevertheless, our Use Case can also be applied to mobiles applications such as Firechat [1] that leverages direct connection between devices in close proximity to temporally connect users.
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Dissemination plan

Dissemination plan

 Press (on-line and off-line) data: number of articles mentioning Feed-a-Gene, estimated audience (circulation), type of citation  Number of cooperation initiatives with other projects (notably other H2020 projects) Certain metrics, termed Dissemination Success Indicators (DSI), will be tracked quarterly to verify that they meet predetermined objectives. This will allow to assess the impact of WP7 activities in real time and to adjust communication and dissemination strategies accordingly if the objectives are not met. The following table present the objectives to be reached by the DSI at M36, M48 and M60.
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EvoEvo Deliverable 6.5: Mid-term dissemination report

EvoEvo Deliverable 6.5: Mid-term dissemination report

Finally, low impact but still interesting results will be submitted to the open-access generalist journal such as PLoS One or Scientific Reports. As far as actors of public health are concerned, the dissemination strategy requires more direct communication. INRIA communication and translational services are in charge of organizing joint meetings with industrialists, politicians and physicians to disseminate the results of the project. It is of course impossible to present here a long-term schedule of such meetings. However, it is worth noting that the project and its results (including the simulator of antibiotic resistance evolution) have been recently presented to a panel of start-ups and physicians during a Lyon BioPôle meeting on infectious diseases (December 10 th 2014), at the French senator chamber (February
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Contact Lifespan and Interest-Based Content Dissemination in Vehicular Networks

Contact Lifespan and Interest-Based Content Dissemination in Vehicular Networks

V. R ELATED W ORK Several works have investigated content dissemination in vehicular networks targeting to optimize both delivery ratio and fan-out delay. For example, in [13] authors proposed an opportunistic data forwarding scheme, named ZOOM, which integrates both contact-level and social-level for fast routing. ZOOM permits to choose the most appropriate mobility infor- mation when deciding next data-relays in order to minimize the end-to-end delay while reducing the network traffic. The authors in [14] presented a protocol for infotainment applica- tion called ROD. This protocol chooses the best relay vehicle in charge of data propagation. Hence, it enhances the band- width use, the end-to-end delay, and the delivery ratio in both highways and urban environment. In [7], the authors proposed a scheme to support geocast communication on highways considering different classes of vehicular applications (safety, traffic information, and multimedia). The proposed scheme is able to reduce the delivery delay for safety applications, and to adequately meet the requirements of multimedia applications. These works achieve valuable results. Unfortunately, most of them do not consider an important criterion: user interests. Even though these dissemination protocols can reach notice- able performance in terms of delivery ratio and delay, they might not be able to maximize the content utility for users. Those studies consider information as a black box, without handling the user’s interest in the content.
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International Production and Dissemination of Information: Results, Methodological Issues, and Statistical Perspectives 1

International Production and Dissemination of Information: Results, Methodological Issues, and Statistical Perspectives 1

Further Considerations Information is stored, collected, disseminated, and distributed according to flows. However, some flows of information do not come from stocks and are not stored—namely, those that result from interpersonal communication or from people’s perceptions. Our eyes perceive a bustling reality whenever we are awake; our ears permanently hear noises, sounds and words; our olfactory and gustatory senses, and our sensory receptors more generally, capture large volumes of information. Yet only a tiny amount of this information is readily accessible in our memories. We also emit a large quantity of information when gesticulating and speaking, part of which is captured (e.g., by video surveillance systems). Nature itself continuously changes under such influences as plant, animal, or meteorological activity, and the increasing number of webcams (used in particular with services such as Skype), along with weather and land imaging satellites, capture a growing share of these transformations for analysis and use.
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TrAD: Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination Protocol for Both Urban and Highway VANETs

TrAD: Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination Protocol for Both Urban and Highway VANETs

improve transportation activities that include traffic safety, transport efficiency and even infotainment on the wheels, in which a great number of traffic event-driven messages are needed to disseminate in a region of interest timely. However, due to the nature of VANETs, highly dynamic mobility and frequent disconnection, data dissemination faces great challenges. Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) protocols are the key technology to mitigate this issue. Therefore, we propose an infrastructure-less Traffic Adaptive data Dissemination (TrAD) protocol that considers road traffic and network traffic status for both highway and urban scenarios. TrAD is flexible to fit the irregular road topology and owns double broadcast suppression techniques. Three state-of-the-art IVC protocols have been compared with TrAD by means of realistic simulations. The performance of all protocols is quantitatively evaluated with different real city maps and traffic routes. Finally, TrAD gets an outstanding overall performance in terms of several metrics, even though under the worse condition of GPS drift.
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Improving skewed data dissemination in structured overlays

Improving skewed data dissemination in structured overlays

122CHAPTER 6. LOAD BALANCING IMPLEMENTATION AND EXPERIMENTS trying to lessen the load of a peer. Finding a good tradeoff between the cost of moving data and the cost of having overloaded peer(s) in the network is challeng- ing and mostly depends on which aspect has the strongest effects on the system performance. Moreover, we try to show in our experiments what could be the best possible distribution, while it is often necessary to offload only a small number of peers to improve performance, which means this would imply less communication and data transfer than in our experiments. By doing so, fewer communications between peers would be necessary to solve range queries for instance, rather than when having a wide range of values disseminated over a wide range of peers. Once again, it is a matter of finding the optimal, or at least the right degree of dissem- ination for a particular system. This problem raises the more general question of oscillation when trying to balance the load. In our case, this effect would not be exclusively caused by the load balancing scheme being used but also by the whole environment around the system like the periodicity of data insertion, the threshold/coefficient being used, or even the number of peers and their respective storage, bandwidth and processing capacities. Furthermore, load balancing might not have to happen with great frequency, depending on how in the existing code is triggered the run_load_balancing_iteration function call. In our case, this method was called periodically but it would have been possible to call it only after the insertion of a large volume of data on a peer, for example. The oscillation effect is outside the scope of this thesis and will not be further discussed later on.
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Reliable Message Dissemination in Mobile Vehicular Networks

Reliable Message Dissemination in Mobile Vehicular Networks

Abstract Vehicular safety applications based on DSRC/802.11p have strict reliability requirement (greater than 0.99). However, it is difficult to achieve high reliability in wireless medium as the transmission is vulnerable to packet collisions and interferences due to various wave propagation issues, such as signal attenuation, noise and jitter. These effects are quite predominant in urban vehicular networks in the presence of high rise buildings which makes communication in vehicular networks quite unreliable. In this paper, we propose a reliable multi-hop broadcast scheme, called Reliable Emergency Message Dissemination scheme (REMD), suitable for a wide range of vehicular safety `applications. We aim to guarantee very high reliability (e.g., 99%) in each hop, with low control overhead while keeping low end-to-end latency for time critical applications. We divide a street into multiple cells to form grid-like zones. Each zone is assigned a zero-correlated unipolar orthogonal code (UPOC) to combat hidden node problem. We apply a proactive local state processing scheme, which makes use of periodic beacons, to accurately estimate reception quality of 802.11p wireless link in each cell; then, we use this information to determine optimal number of broadcast repetitions in order to satisfy the predefined reliability requirements in each hop. In addition, to ensure reliability in multi-hop, we utilize cooperative communication. Simulation results show that REMD achieves very high reliability in lossy wireless channel. Furthermore, REMD reduces bandwidth consumption and satisfies latency requirements for time-critical vehicular applications.
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AGRICULTURAL KNOWLEDGE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND INNOVATIONS FOR TECHNOLOGY DISSEMINATION AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT

AGRICULTURAL KNOWLEDGE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND INNOVATIONS FOR TECHNOLOGY DISSEMINATION AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT

Abstract — Achieving food security and environmental issues become greatest challenge of humankind. Further, natural resources are almost reaching its limit and hence there is a global call for optimum utilisation and also conservation of natural resources. In this existing scenario, sustainable natural resources management heavily relies on sound sustainable agricultural practices. The sustainable agricultural practices dissemination, diffusion and adoption depend on agricultural knowledge information systems. To disseminate sustainable agricultural knowledge and technology, worldwide agricultural extension systems are undergoing a great transition. Efforts for reforming national extension systems are underway. At the same time, the agriculture knowledge infrastructure is evolving in a big way with the emergence of pluralistic extension providers and innovations to disseminate sustainable agricultural technologies to the farming community. A research study was conducted in India to compare the extension objectives and nature of the farm technologies disseminated by the public extension, agri-business firms, agricultural consultancies and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) indicated that a great majority of the farmers had favourable perception towards the technologies transferred by the NGOs. Because, NGOs’ extension personnel disseminated location and client specific, need based, locally feasible technologies with more emphasis on local wisdom and traditional knowledge blending with the low input modern farm technologies. The technological attributes wise perception of the clientele were alos documented. Further, this article make an attempt to review and analyse recent developments in sustainable farm technology delivery systems and reform measures such as; decentralization, privatization, demand driven and participatory approaches in farm technology delivery. Further, this article highlights the innovations for sustainable technology dissemination and diffusion such as; farmer to farmer extension, single window extension delivery, integrated and broad based extension, gender specific extension, farmer participatory research and extension, validation, refinement and integration of indigenous knowledge systems with modern farm technology, self help group (SHG) approaches, grass root institutions, multi agency extension, market extension, environmental extension education, extension plus approaches, public-private-NGO partnerships and information and communication technology (ICT) initiatives.
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Dissemination of reconfiguration policies on mesh networks

Dissemination of reconfiguration policies on mesh networks

In a highly distributed and volatile environment, one of the challenges is the propagation of reconfiguration policies. Handling concurrent updates of shared data is a second challenge to be solved, as two nodes can trigger concurrent reconfigurations. Consistent dissemination of models at runtime in distributed systems requires a synchronization layer that solves these two challenges: in- formation dissemination and concurrent update. Research in the field of peer- to-peer communication has produced many algorithms to deal with information dissemination in a volatile context [6]. Many paradigms are available to deal with this concurrent data exchange problems (e.g. vector clocks [7]). In this paper, we adapt a combination of gossip-based algorithms and vector clocks techniques to safely propagate reconfiguration policies by preserving architecture models consistency between all computation nodes of a distributed system. We have implemented a specific algorithm, which propagates configuration changes in a consistent manner in spite of frequent node link failures, relying on its payload of configuration data to improve its efficiency. We provide qualitative and quan- titative evaluations of this algorithm, to help answering the following questions: (i) What is the influence of communication strategy on the propagation delay of models? (ii) Does a high rate of node link failure prevent the propagation of mod- els and what is the impact of link failures on propagation delays? (iii) Does the algorithm detect concurrent updates of models and does it handle reconciliation correctly?
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Tracking Freeriders in Gossip-Based Content Dissemination Systems

Tracking Freeriders in Gossip-Based Content Dissemination Systems

The blaming architecture of LiFTinG is built on top of the AVMON [43] monitoring overlay 5 . In AVMON, nodes are as- signed a fixed-size set of M random managers consistent over time, which makes it very appealing in our setting, specifically a dynamic peer-to-peer environment subject to churn with pos- sibly colluding nodes. The fact that the number M of managers is constant makes the protocol scalable, as the monitoring load at each node is independent of the system size. Randomness prevents colluding freeriders from covering each other up, and consistency makes long-term blame history at the managers, and thus long-term follow up, possible. The monitoring rela- tionship is based on a hash function and can be advertised in a gossip-fashion by piggybacking node’s monitors in the view maintenance messages (e.g., exchanges of local views in the distributed peer-sampling service). Doing so, nodes quickly discover other nodes’ managers – and are therefore able to blame the nodes if necessary – even in the presence of churn. In addition, nodes can locally verify (i.e., without the need for extra communication) whether the node-to-managers mapping is correct by hashing the nodes’ IP addresses, thus preventing freeriders from forging fake or colluding managers. If a man- ager does not map correctly to a node, a revocation against the concerned node is sent.
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Cash Providers: Asset Dissemination over Intermediation Chains

Cash Providers: Asset Dissemination over Intermediation Chains

The game first involves an origination stage in which an “originator” has an investment opportunity and can issue an asset backed on its return. A typical example would be a bank with securitizable mortgages. Three external sources of financing can be combined: unsecured borrowing at the market rate, secured borrowing using the asset as collateral, and the sale of some units of the asset. The originator conducts his sales on an OTC market and makes offers to his ‘partners’, financial institutions with which he usually trades. A partner who accepts the offer uses his cash and the three external financing sources just described to finance his purchase. In particular, he can sell some of the units bought (possibly at a different price) to an OTC partner, in which case the process goes on until an offer is turned down by everyone, or until no new offer is made.
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Preference Dissemination by Sharing Viewpoints: Simulating Serendipity

Preference Dissemination by Sharing Viewpoints: Simulating Serendipity

Figure 4: M1 Red and M2 Red evolution when princes mainly use link-by-link exploration (µ=30%, ẞ=10%). 7.2 Adaptation to Real Web Data We also conducted a similar experiment with real data on movies and user ratings. We studied a Web dataset (MovieLens), in which explicit semantics were mixed with social contributions. This dataset consisted in two sets of 100,000 and 1,000,000 ratings which had been collected by the GroupLens Research Project at the University of Minnesota. In our MovieLens experiment, users elicited preferences when they associated movies with ratings. Initially, each movie was linked to other movies by metadata such as actors, directors or genres. For instance, the genre characteristic corresponded to the shape characteristic in our Serendip simulation. All films, as well as other resources such as genres, were initially added to the KG. During each cycle, a portion of the ratings was added to the KG as viewpoints, once again simulating the contributions of the social Web. We observed knowledge crystallizing progressively around the reviewers. This experiment showed us that when working with such a recommendation system, we may observe that structured data (genres, actors, director) do bootstrap the creation of subjective (social) knowledge. Integrating user data such as gender, age group, job and movie metadata (genre, release year) showed us new relations. User was closing movies and movies were semantically reproaching users. One of the goal we gave to us with ViewpointS was also to observe dynamics in an evolving represented knowledge.
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Dissemination of Health Information within Social Networks

Dissemination of Health Information within Social Networks

information would depend simply on how many people you have of each cognitive type. If you have too few people at the beginning of the chain, they will transmit the information to too few people in the second group, not enough to make anyone care in the third group and the diffusion fizzles out early. If there are more people in the first group, but very few in the second group, the outcome could be similar etc. The thing to notice is that in these models, propensities inherent to each individual that matter [Granovetter, 1978, Kuran, 1987] after that only the aggregate number – or proportion – of people who already adopted makes a difference. A different approach assumes that all people have the same propensity but they are located differently in a social structure because they are connected differently to others. Whether to adopt or transmit then depends on their relative position – their spatial [Ryan and Gross, 1943, Schelling, 1978] or social proximity [Coleman et al., 1957] to those who already adopted.
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EvoEvo Deliverable 6.6: Program of interdisciplinary dissemination workshop

EvoEvo Deliverable 6.6: Program of interdisciplinary dissemination workshop

archive for the deposit and dissemination of sci- entific research documents, whether they are pub- L’archive ouverte pluridisciplinaire HAL, est destinée au dépôt et à la diffusion de documents scientifiques de niveau recherche, publiés ou non, To cite this version:

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Efficient Information Dissemination in Wireless Multi-hop.

Efficient Information Dissemination in Wireless Multi-hop.

4.4. PRINCIPAL RATIONALE 73 except nodes around the border, and the source is located in the middle of the network. Figure 4.12(b) represents the results of a random unit disk graph where there exist 400 total nodes with a 20 node density (the average number of nodes in a range= 20), and the source is the node with the largest neighborhood. In both graphs, both the x and y axis represent the position of each node on the plane; the value on the vertical z axis represents a receiving rate, a max flow and a capacity of min-cut. For the randomly generated unit disk graph, there is interpolation. Note that the min-cut presented in Figure 4.12 is the max flow (a capacity of the min-cut) between a source and each destination; it is not a max flow from the source to all nodes, (or the maximum broadcast rate). The maximum broadcast flow (rate) is the minimum of capacities of all min-cuts between the source and all nodes as stated in section 3.3.2. Each max flow (a capacity of min-cut) is obtained by using a software library implementing the max-flow computation algorithm [79] after converting a hypergraph modeling a wireless network into a general graph as explained in section 4.3.3. Most of all, the graph in Figure 4.12(a) clearly shows that only nodes around the border have a lower min-cut than other nodes (the min-cut at the border is 2). The result confirms our intuition that a small neighborhood causes a low receiving rate (low capacities of min- cuts and low max flows), and the low capacities of min-cuts of a few nodes finally bound a maximum broadcast rate at 2 instead of 4. Similarly, results in Figure 4.12(b) show nodes around the border have low min-cuts, but some nodes away from the border also have low min-cuts like n22 in Figure 4.11. Hence, for general networks, we introduce an adapted rate selection algorithm based on local topology information.
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Media and Communication History

Media and Communication History

We also hope many of you will join our group. Annual dues have been set at $40 for regular CHA members and $20 for graduate students. We are in the process of setting up a website and will inform you when it is up and running. At the founding meeting in Ottawa, an Executive Committee was elected, with the following members: Chair, Mary Vipond (Concordia University); Secretary, Gene Allen (Ryerson University); CCA liaison, Barbara Freeman (Carleton University); Treasurer, John Willis, (Historian, Canadian Postal Museum/Canadian Museum of Civilization).

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On the growth and dissemination laws in a mathematical model of metastatic growth

On the growth and dissemination laws in a mathematical model of metastatic growth

Yorke et al., 1993 , Hartung et al., 2014 , Haeno et al., 2012 ]. Of note however, in 2000, Iwata, Kawasaki and Shigesada proposed a model particularly well suited for description of the time dynamics of a population of secondary tumors [ Iwata et al., 2000 ]. This model can be easily adapted to longitudinal data of total metastatic burden and has been recently shown able to fit such data in several animal models [ Hartung et al., 2014 , Benzekry et al., 2015 ]. Based on one of this study, we will focus here on the identifiability aspects of particular coefficients of the model, respectively related to the growth and dissemination laws. In other words, our aim is to determine what can and what cannot be discriminated based on the data that we dispose on one hand, and the formalism of [ Iwata et al., 2000 ] on the other.
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Sovereignty and Communication Rights

Sovereignty and Communication Rights

In the thirty years since senior Canadian policy experts endorsed the right to communicate much has changed. The global expansion of a technology driven economy, of human rights, and of electronic communications creates an opportunity to advance communication rights as embodied in the basic right to communicate. Almost all significant advances in human rights arise out of periods of widespread social and political turmoil, wars and revolutions. xvi Canada is positioned to provide global leadership because both communication and human rights are integral parts of Canadian culture. Furthermore, the right to communicate provides a judicial and political framework for addressing communication issues of central concern to Canadians: cultural and linguistic identity, intellectual property rights, intellectual freedom, freedom of the press, and so on. The confluence of the universalization of global interactive communications and human rights makes Canada at this time well situated to formulate a legal and policy framework derived from a right to communicate.
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Dissemination and price of cotton in Mesopotamia during the 1st millennium BCE

Dissemination and price of cotton in Mesopotamia during the 1st millennium BCE

military operations in India, and created a satrapy in the Indus basin region. At the time, linen fabrics “from Gandhara” reached Babylonia, which attest lively textiles exchanges between India and Mesopotamia. The cultivation of kidinnû in the vicinity of Babylon can be deduced from a text dated from the reign of Darius I. According to Herodotus, Xerxes I incorporated Indians soldiers, dressed in cotton, in his army. Iranian and Babylonian contingents could therefore have seen these particular garments. Alexander’s conquest intensified the contacts with India, which continued throughout the Hellenistic period when Greek settlers established themselves in Babylon. Cotton was perhaps mentioned in a dowry list from Babylon from the 3 rd century BCE, which might attest the diffusion of
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